Our courses

Subjects

University Preparation English | Accounting | Australian StudiesBiology | Chemistry | Economics | Foundations of Social Sciences | Foundations of Visual Art and Design | Government and Law | Information Technology | International StudiesMathematics | Media Studies and Communication | Music | Physics


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University Preparation English

English A & B

The subject provides training in the English language. The courses aim to enhance the students speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension skills in the language. These skills provide students the essential academic level required to study at university.

Topics include:

  • Language skills, including oral presentations, academic writing, advanced reading and comprehension and active listening to lectures, expository writing 
  • Advanced study skills for academic achievement including analysis of learning styles, critical analysis, independent learning, time management, research and referencing and project management of group assignments.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results for both English A and English B courses.

Prerequisite: English A is a prerequisite for English (Humanities) B

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Accounting

Accounting A

The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the accounting process.

Topics include:

  • Basic accounting concepts
  • Double-entry bookkeeping
  • Financial acounting reports 
  • Cash flow analysis

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination final results

Prerequisite: Nil. 

Accounting B

The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the management accounting.

Topics include:

  • Budgeting  
  • Ratio analysis
  • Accounting principles
  • Accounting standards and ethics

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination final results

Prerequisite: Accounting A. 

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Australian Studies

Australian Studies A

Australian Studies gives students an overview of the Australian environment and associated contemporary issues. This subject includes participation in excursions, group work and oral presentations. Students are given the opportunity to further explore relevant areas of interest through the development of Individual Research Projects.

Topics include:

  • Origins of Australia
  • Climates and climate extremes
  • Landscapes
  • Environments of Australia
  • Flora
  • Fauna.

Students will also gain an understanding of important contemporary issues facing Australia such as:

  • Global warming
  • Climate change
  • Water management
  • The nuclear debate.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

Australian Studies B

Australian Studies B gives students insight into Australian History including the early experiences of Aboriginal lifestyle, conflict with European and Asian settlers post 1788, and Federation of modern Australia.
Students are given the opportunity to further explore relevant areas of interest and develop skills in research presentations.

Topics include:

  • Early Aboriginal life
  • European exploration
  • Colonial development
  • Federation
  • Australia in the 20th century.

Students will also gain an understanding of very important contemporary issues facing Australia such as:

  • Changing immigration
  • Changing rights and freedom
  • Asylum seekers.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

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Biology

Biology A

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and processes associated with living organisms. The students are then led from this basis to a study of areas of modern biology in the context of the world around us. Throughout the course the students are introduced to practical, research, analysis and presentation skills underpinning this subject.

Topics include:

  • Cells
  • Classification
  • Evolution
  • Mendelian Genetics
  • Genetic Engineering.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

Biology B

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the structures, processes and systems in plants and animals in an Australian context. Through the study of the origin of life and ecology students will develop an understanding of the evolution and uniqueness of the Australian biota. Throughout the course the students are introduced to the practical, research, analysis and presentation skills underpinning the study of this subject.

Topics include:

  • Plant and animal systems
  • Ecology
  • Origin of life
  • Continental drift
  • Biochemistry

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

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Chemistry

Chemistry A

Chemistry assists in the development of a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts in inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. It also assists students to develop the laboratory and process skills needed for an undergraduate study of Chemistry.

Topics include:

  • Properties of matter
  • Basic chemical reactions
  • Introduction to stoichiometry
  • Structure and bonding.

Each topic is accompanied by practical work and practical work assessments.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Year 11 Chemistry or equivalent. 

Co-requisite: At least Mathematics for Humanities A, however Mathematicsfor Science A is recommended.

Chemistry B

Chemistry assists in the development of a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts in inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. It also assists students to develop the laboratory and process skills needed for an undergraduate study of Chemistry.

Topics include:

  • Additional chemical reactions
  • Reaction stoichiometry
  • Organic chemistry
  • Energy and electrochemistry
  • Equilibrium, acids and bases.

Each topic is accompanied by practical work and practical work assessments.

Assessment

  • 40% coursework
  • 60% examination results

Prerequisite: Chemistry A.  At least Mathematics for Science.

Co-requisite: At least Mathematics for Humanities B, however Mathematicsfor Science B is recommended.

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Economics

Economics A (Microeconomics)

This course provides an interesting insight into the operation and regulation of the modern market based economy. It deals with the main market models and the government policies necessary to regulate them. After completing the course, students should have a good understanding of the operation of the market economy and the implications of and need for government intervention into the free market.

Topics include:

  • The Economic Problem
  • Demand & Supply
  • Elasticity
  • Government Intervention
  • Theory of the Firm
  • Returns to Scale
  • Markets.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

Economics B (Macroeconomics)

This course provides an overview of the operation of the economy and the sectors and institutions within the economy. It explains the underlying reasons for the contraction and expansion of economic activity, the main economic goals or policy targets and the policy instruments used to achieve them. After completing the course, students should have a good understanding of the need for macroeconomic management and the likely policy response to potential macroeconomic problems.

Topics include:

  • Circular flow of Income
  • Income & Expenditure Analysis
  • Economic Issues
  • Economic Policy
  • International Trade

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

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Foundations of Social Science

Foundation of Social Science A

The aim of the course is to introduce students to concepts of personal development, social change and research skills. This course is an introduction to Psychology and Sociology at university.

Topics include:

  • Introduction to development theories used in the future study of Psychology and Sociology
  • The "nature-nurture debate" 
  • Socialisation agents in the development of a personal identity
  • Social theory development to explain the aspects of change in communities and why some social elements of society remain unchanged 
  • Students will develop skills in using a range of research methodologies and apply these to their chosen Personal Interest Project. This project is developed over a 20 week period and results in a 5,000 word report
    (finalised in Foundations of Social Science B) and equips student with a sound basis for researching and writing long essays and dissertations at university level.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

Foundation of Social Science B

This course builds on the Personal Interest Project started in the Foundations of Social Science. A particular focus at this stage is writing commentaries on primary research data and culminating all research into a final
report/essay. There is a strong emphasis on development of strong writing skills at this stage.

Topics include:

  • Revision of essential research methodologies
  • Inequality and Difference – where students learn about issues of discrimination and the effects of discrimination on different communities 
  • Religion and belief – this shows that there are both religious and non religious belief systems and helps students to explore similarities between belief systems and to appreciate the importance of tolerance in a
    multicultural world.

Assessment

  • 60% coursework
  • 40% examination results

Prerequisite: Foundations of Social Science A

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Foundations of Visual Art and Design

Foundations of Visual Arts and Design – Elective A

This subject introduces students to a wide variety of media and art making techniques. It is designed to encourage and develop creative problem solving, research methods, art making skills, designing, independent organising and critical thinking in art making, art theory and history of art and design. Approximately 60% of class time is devoted to practical art making.

Topics include:

  • Drawing
  • Printmaking
  • Painting
  • Digital art and design
  • History and Critical Theory of Art and Design.

Assessment:

  • 50% Art making
  • 50% examination.

Prerequisite: Nil.

Foundations of Visual Arts and Design – Core A

This subject is intended for students who are interested in Visual Arts and Design for their tertiary studies. Students are introduced to a wide variety of media and art making techniques. It is designed to encourage and develop a greater depth of creative problem solving, research methods, art making skills, designing to a brief, independent organising and critical thinking in art making, theory and history of art and design.

Topics include:

  • Drawing
  • Printmaking
  • Painting
  • Digital art and design
  • History and Critical Theory of Art and Design.

Approximately 60% of class time is devoted to practical art making.

Assessment:

  • 50% Art making
  • 50% examination.

Prerequisite: Nil.

Co-requisite: Foundations of Visual Arts and Design Elective A.

Foundations of Visual Arts and Design – Elective B

This subject is designed to extend the skills developed in Elective A, techniques, critical language and understanding of art works gained in Foundations of Visual Arts & Design A. Students will develop a body of work in their preferred form based on the research of influencing artists and designers, concepts, techniques and media. Approximately 60% of class time is devoted to practical art making.

Topics include:

  • Design
  • Computer Generated Imagery
  • History and Critical Theory of Art and Design
  • Developing a body of work
  • Developing a portfolio of art work.

Students will produce a body of work in Visual Arts which may include: painting/drawing/printmaking/sculpture/photography/digital media/installation etc.
Students will produce a body of work in design and select from: architectural design/textiles/fashion/interior design/industrial design/graphic design etc.

Assessment:

  • 50% Art making
  • 50% examination.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Visual Arts & Design – Elective A

Note: The final body of work and the portfolio is assessed by Taylors College and the Sydney College of Arts (Sydney University).

Foundations of Visual Arts and Design – Core B

This subject is designed to extend the art making skills, techniques, critical language and understanding of art works gained in Foundations of Visual Arts & Design – Core A and who are who are undertaking Foundations of Visual Arts & Design – Elective B. Students will develop a body of work in their preferred form based on the research of influencing artists and designers, concepts, techniques and media. Approximately 60% of class time is devoted to practical art making.

Topics include:

  • History and Critical Theory of Art and Design
  • Digital art and design 
  • Developing a body of work
  • Developing a portfolio of art work.

Students will produce a body of work in Visual Arts which may include: painting/drawing/printmaking/sculpture/photography/digital media/installation etc.
Students will produce a body of work in design and select from: architectural design/textiles/fashion/interior design/industrial design/graphic design etc.

Assessment:

  • 50% Art making
  • 50% examination.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Visual Arts and Design – Elective A and Foundations of Visual Arts & Design – Core A.
Co-requisite: Foundations of Visual Arts and Design – Elective B.
Note: The final body of work and the portfolio is assessed by Taylors College and the Sydney College of Arts (Sydney University).

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Government and Law

Government and Law A (Development of Australian Law)

This subject gives students an understanding of the influences of the British parliamentary system on the development of Australian law and the system of government as it now exists. It also gives an introduction to the criminal justice system operating in Australia.

Topics include:

  • Basic Legal Concepts : Customs, rules, laws
  • Sources Of Contemporary Australian Law: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Customary Law before 1788, Common law, Statute law, the Constitution, common and civil law systems
  • An exploration of the criminal justice system operating in Australia: the nature of crime, parties to a crime, categories of crime, the court hierarchy, the criminal trial process, sentencing and punishment.

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Nil.

Government and Law B (Issues in the Law)

This subject introduces students to current issues related to the protection and enforcement of human rights and the effectiveness of legal and non-legal measures in promoting peace and resolving conflict between states.

Topics include:

  • The nature and development of human rights
  • Promoting and enforcing human rights
  • Examples of contemporary human rights issues: child soldiers and human trafficking and slavery
  • The nature of world order
  • Themes and challenges for world order and responses to world order.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Prerequisite: Government and Law A.

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Information Technology

Software for Business (IT Module A)

This course complements the theory attained in an accounting/business course by providing the technical skills used to customise application programs. It's a 'hands-on' course that will show you how to setup an Internet-based company effectively using software. The module will draw upon students' artistic skills required in product marketing, their design skills used in web-page creation, and their modelling skills to representing existing businesses. 

Topics include:

  • Marketing through multimedia techniques
  • Business Modelling by creating customised database applications 
  • Financial analysis using spreadsheet template
  • Ecommerce using web development tool

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Nil.

Software for Programmers (IT module B)

This course will appeal to creative students wishing to create their own software. Students will learn screen design and how to write the actual program 'code' using common programming languages. They will use techniques found in both traditional and modern development approaches.

Topics include:

  • Development approaches
  • Analysis and design
  • Code and testing
  • Develop a complete software package, eg a game.

Assessment:

  • 60% coursework 
  • 40% final examination

Prerequisite: Nil.

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International Studies

International Studies A – Politics

International Studies A is an introduction to International and Global politics in the modern world. The course explores the factors that shape the main concepts and themes in global politics and teaches research and analysis skills to help students prepare for university study. Students are expected to prepare and present regular student seminars which will assists development of oral and presentation skills.

Areas to be investigated include:

  • Origins of the sovereign state.
  • Evolution of the system of states to 1900: war, trade and imperialism.
  • World Wars I and II.
  • Cold War to Decolonisation.
  • Post- Cold War and contemporary era.

Assessment:

  • 60% coursework
  • 40% final examination.

Prerequisite: Nil

International Studies B – Economics

International Economics is a course that prepares students for further study in International Economics or Business, International Studies, Arts Economics, or Political Economy. The course is non mathematical and focuses on problem solving questions rather than essay style questions.

Students are introduced to many of the problems faced by international business: dealing with exchange rate risk, arranging finance for overseas operations and negotiating the various logistical problems associated with underdeveloped regions. This course could be your gateway into a career in international business.

The course is very practical and uses many case studies of international businesses and countries. Students may be able to focus on their home country whilst being able to learn about many other regions of the world.

Topics include:

  • Globalisation
  • Economic Development
  • International Trade
  • Foreign Exchange
  • Global Financial Markets

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% final examination.

Prerequisite: Nil

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Mathematics

Mathematics for Humanities A

This course is intended to give students an understanding of, and competence in, aspects of Mathematics that are applicable to the real world. It provides students with the background and skills necessary for University study requiring some mathematics.

Mathematics for Humanities A may be studied as a minor.

Topics include:

  • Basic Arithmetic and Algebra
  • Functions and Quadratic Functions
  • Calculus
  • Trigonometry.

Assessment:

  • 40% coursework 
  • 60% examination.

Prerequisite: Year 11 Mathematics or equivalent.

 

Mathematics for Humanities B

This course extends the mathematical studies of Mathematics for Humanities A with particular emphasis on applications to problems in Economics and Finance.

Topics include:

  • Further Trigonometry
  • Logarithmic and Exponential Functions
  • Sequences and Series
  • Financial Mathematics
  • Applications of Calculus to Economics
  • Statistics
  • Probability.

Assessment:

  • 40% coursework 
  • 60% examination.

Prerequisite: Mathematics for Humanities A or Mathematics for Science A.

Mathematics for Science A

This course is intended to give students an understanding of, and competence in, aspects of Mathematics that are applicable to the real world. It provides students with the background and skills necessary for university study requiring a significant level of mathematics.

Mathematics for Science A may be studied as a minor.

Topics include:

  • Basic Arithmetic and Algebra
  • Functions and Quadratic Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Calculus
  • Trigonometry.

Assessment:

  • 40% coursework 
  • 60% examination.

Prerequisite: Year 11 Mathematics or equivalent.

Mathematics for Science B

This course extends the mathematical studies of Mathematics for Science A with particular emphasis on applications to physical problems.

Topics include:

  • Further Trigonometry
  • Logarithmic and Exponential Functions
  • Sequences and Series
  • Further Calculus
  • Applications of Calculus to the Physical World
  • Counting Techniques and Probability.

Assessment:

  • 40% coursework 
  • 60% examination.

Prerequisite: Mathematics for Science A.

Advanced Mathematics A

The Advanced Mathematics course is designed for students with a special interest in mathematics who have shown that they possess special aptitude for the subject. It provides students with the background and skills necessary for university study requiring a high level of mathematics.

Advanced Mathematics A may be studied as a minor, subject to the prerequisite below.

Topics include:

  • Complex Numbers
  • Matrices
  • Vectors
  • Mathematical Induction
  • Advanced Trigonometry.

Assessment:

  • 40% coursework 
  • 60% examination.

Prerequisite: Students must achieve a high standard in the Mathematics test held during Orientation at the College and be concurrently studying Mathematics for Science A or have achieved a high level in Mathematics for Science A.

Advanced Mathematics B

This course extends topics from the core Mathematics for Science course. The material is treated in considerable depth. Advanced Mathematics B may be studied as a minor, subject to prerequisites below.

Topics include:

  • Advanced Graphing Techniques
  • Further Integration
  • Advanced Applications of Calculus
  • Volumes
  • Further Induction
  • Binomial Theorem
  • Further Counting Techniques.

Assessment:

  • 40% coursework 
  • 60% examination.

Prerequisite: Advanced Mathematics A or high achievement in Mathematics for Science A and completion or concurrent study of Mathematics for Science B.

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Media Studies and Communication

If you are interested in language and how texts work, and how your knowledge and understanding of that can put you in a powerful position then this subject is for you. Equally, if you wish to enter the world of public relations and the mass media, journalism, TV, radio and fi lm making, then this subject is also for you.

Media Studies and Communication A (Communication and The Media as an Institution)

In this module, we examine the cultural, social and situational context of texts, in particular how "stories" occur in different contexts. Also, we take an historical view of the media in Australia, looking specifically at media ownership and the production of newspapers: both tabloid and broadsheet.

Topics include:

  • Text in context, context of culture, context of situation
  • Genre and Register analysis, focusing particularly on Story Genre
  • Media Ownership and Regulation
  • Newspaper Production.

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Nil.

Media Studies and Communication B (Ethics in the Australian Media and Communication in the Media)

Here, we focus on the ethical issues facing journalists, and then we look at how "stories" and photographs in the media are produced and how a careful analysis of media texts can help us to determine the power of the media.

Topics include:

  • A case study on Ethics, eg, chequebook journalism, privacy issues
  • News stories in the Media, eg, hard news stories, soft news stories
  • Visual images in the media – image analysis
  • Images accompanying news stories and advertisements.

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Media and Communication A (Communication and The Media as an Institution).
Co-requisite: English (Arts).

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Music

Music Elective A

This subject aims to develop a fundamental understanding of Music. Students will gain the opportunity to perform in concert (solo, duo and ensemble), attend concerts, meet professional musicians and widen their music repertoire.

Topics include:

  • Solo and Ensemble Performance
  • Music Theory (including Music History & Music Aural)
  • Individual Class (one-on-one lessons are provided to each student for an additional fee).

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: This subject assumes students have some knowledge of musical notation. An audition and interview are required.

Music Elective B

Topics include:

  • Solo and Ensemble Performance
  • Music Theory (including Music History & Music Aural)
  • Individual Class (one-on-one lessons are provided to each student for an additional fee).

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Pass Music Elective A OR special audition and theory test.

Music Core Performance A

This subject aims to prepare students who want to take music for a tertiary subject or degree at a university.

Topics include:

  • Develop music performance skill 
  • Attending concerts
  • Performing in concert (solo, duo, ensemble)
  • Widening musical repertoire
  • Meeting professional musicians

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: An equivalent to ABRSM or AMEB Grade 6 practical for instruments.

Audition: In person or a standard video tape or DVD. 

Music Core Performance B

Topics include:

  • Develop music performance skill 
  • Attending concerts
  • Performing in concert (solo, duo, ensemble)
  • Widening musical repertoire
  • Meeting professional musicians  

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Music Core Performance A.

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Physics

Physics A (Motion In Our World)

This course will offer learning experiences that help students develop an understanding of physicists work. Students will be introduced to the knowledge and applications which result from the work of physicists.

Experiments form a major component of the course and are designed to develop practical skills and introduce students to new technology.

Topics include:

  • Equations of motion
  • Forces and Newton's Laws
  • Energy, momentum and work
  • Electrostatics and electrodynamics

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Year 11 Physics or equivalent.
Co-requisite: At least Mathematics for Humanities, but Mathematics for Science is strongly recommended.

Physics B (Waves, Light and Astronomy)

This course will offer learning experiences that help students develop an understanding of physicists work. Students will be introduced to the knowledge and applications which result from the work of physicists.
Experiments form a major component of the course which is designed to develop practical skills and introduce students to new technology. An integrated approach to the theory and practical use of waves is adopted to emphasise their applications in the study of astronomy.

Topics include:

  • Astronomy
  • Waves and Light
  • Electricity and Magnetism.

Assessment:

  • 50% coursework 
  • 50% final examination

Prerequisite: Year 11 Physics or equivalent.
Co-requisite: At least Mathematics for Humanities, but Mathematics for Science is strongly recommended.

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Extended Courses

English

Description: The English course will be taught in modules, including attention to all four skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening), as well as grammar with extensive independent tutorial support for students with specific needs.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

Australian Identity

Description: This course focuses on the human characteristics of contemporary Australian society, on the factors that have influenced the creation of a unique Australian identity and a diversity of Australian communities. The course aims to promote knowledge, skills, understanding and values regarding Australia's physical and human environments and aspects of Australian society – its individuals, families and communities.

Assessment

  • 50% coursework
  • 50% examination results

"As well as Extended English and Australian Identity, in the first 19 weeks students choose 2 subjects from Accounting A, Australian Studies A, Chemistry A, Economics A, Mathematics for Humanities A the Standard program."

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